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New every morning is your love, great God of light, and all day long you are working for good in the world. Stir up in us desire to serve you, to live peacefully with our neighbors and all your creation, and to devote each day to your Son, our Savior Jesus Christ. Amen.

"A Liturgy for Morning Prayer," Upper Room Worshipbook

Used by permission from the Book of Common Worship, © 2018 Westminster John Knox Press. All rights reserved. This prayer appears in “A Liturgy for Morning Prayer” in Upper Room Worshipbook.

 

Today's Reflection

Of course, it’s easy to feel hopeful when things are going our way; when the boss is happy and the children are behaving; when you feel God is smiling on you. Anyone can hope for continued sunshine on a day without clouds. But for Christians, hope empowers us to trust that we’ll survive the days that are dark. Hope is not only about planning for the future, although it is that. It is also about remembering the past and reminding ourselves that just as God has been with us before, so shall God remain, whether or not our “hopes” are met to our satisfaction.

—Amy Lyles Wilson, in Hope: It's More Than Wishful Thinking, compiled and introduced by Amy Lyles Wilson (Fresh Air Books, 2010)

Today's Question

What does it look like for you to practice hope and trust on dark days? Join the conversation.

Today's Scripture

Why are you cast down, O my soul,
and why are you disquieted within me?
Hope in God; for I shall again praise him,
my help and my God.

—Psalm 42:11 (NRSV)

Prayer for the Week

New every morning is your love, great God of light, and all day long you are working for good in the world. Stir up in us desire to serve you, to live peacefully with our neighbors and all your creation, and to devote each day to your Son, our Savior Jesus Christ. Amen.
Submit your prayer to The Upper Room.

Something More

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Lectionary Readings

(Courtesy of Vanderbilt Divinity Library)

Looking for lectionary-based resources? Learn more about The Upper Room Disciplines.

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Today's Reflection

Forgiveness constitutes a decision to call forth and rebuild that love which is the only authentic ground of any human relationship. Such love forms the sole secure ground of our relationship with God as well. Indeed, it is only because God continually calls forth and rebuilds this love with us that we are capable of doing so with one another. Thus, to forgive is to participate in the mystery of God’s love.

—Marjorie J. Thompson, in Forgiveness: Perspectives on Making Peace with Your Past, compiled and introduced by Amy Lyles Wilson (Fresh Air Books, 2008)

Today's Question

How does focusing on God’s love help you forgive others? Join the conversation.

Today's Scripture

When deeds of iniquity overwhelm us,
you forgive our transgressions.

—Psalm 65:3 (NRSV)

Prayer for the Week

Our Father in heaven,
hallowed be your name,
your kingdom come,
your will be done,
on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us today our daily bread.
And forgive us our debts,
as we also have forgiven our debtors.
And lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from the evil one.

(This week's prayer can be found in Matthew 6:9-13, NIV.)
Submit your prayer to The Upper Room.

Something More

Buy 2 copies of The Upper Room Disciplines 2022 and bring a friend along as you walk in spiritual wisdom in 2022. Learn more.

Lectionary Readings

(Courtesy of Vanderbilt Divinity Library)

Looking for lectionary-based resources? Learn more about The Upper Room Disciplines.

5 Comments | Join the Conversation.

 

Today's Reflection

Authentic forgiveness—deep-hearted, full-spirited forgiveness—cannot be forced. Inauthentic forgiveness—words spoken out of obligation or coercion without the heart’s concurrence—is a lie. This lie may deceive both the forgiver and the forgiven, but it does not deceive God. Neither does it incarnate the divine intent of forgiveness: to remove the barriers to a holy and right relationship, where the Spirit can move freely, gladly, and creatively.

—Jean M. Blomquist, in Forgiveness: Perspectives on Making Peace with Your Past (Fresh Air Books, 2008)

Today's Question

Have you ever felt obligated or coerced to forgive? What does authentic forgiveness feel like for you? Join the conversation.

Today's Scripture

So when you are offering your gift at the altar, if you remember that your brother or sister has something against you, leave your gift there before the altar and go; first be reconciled to your brother or sister, and then come and offer your gift.
—Matthew 5:23-24 (NRSV)

Prayer for the Week

Our Father in heaven,
hallowed be your name,
your kingdom come,
your will be done,
on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us today our daily bread.
And forgive us our debts,
as we also have forgiven our debtors.
And lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from the evil one.

(This week's prayer can be found in Matthew 6:9-13, NIV.)
Submit your prayer to The Upper Room.

Something More

Buy 2 copies of The Upper Room Disciplines 2022 and bring a friend along as you walk in spiritual wisdom in 2022. Learn more.

Lectionary Readings

(Courtesy of Vanderbilt Divinity Library)

Looking for lectionary-based resources? Learn more about The Upper Room Disciplines.

4 Comments | Join the Conversation.

 

Today's Reflection

The question Will I be hurt again? arises not only in situations of violence and abuse but in the daily push-and-pull of life. Many people undertake the process of forgiving only when they are assured that it will not make them vulnerable to the offending person. They want no part of a forgiveness that exposes them to ongoing hurt. We must therefore understand what the gospel asks of us. It does not require us to remain in situations of danger or to put up with ongoing hurt. Protecting ourselves from harm is our right and duty.

—Kathleen Fischer, in Forgiveness: Perspectives on Making Peace with Your Past, compiled and introduced by Amy Lyles Wilson (Fresh Air Books, 2008)

Today's Question

Who helps you discern how to forgive while setting healthy boundaries? Join the conversation.

Today's Scripture

Make no friends with those given to anger,
and do not associate with hotheads,
or you may learn their ways
and entangle yourself in a snare.

—Proverbs 22:24-25 (NRSV)

Prayer for the Week

Our Father in heaven,
hallowed be your name,
your kingdom come,
your will be done,
on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us today our daily bread.
And forgive us our debts,
as we also have forgiven our debtors.
And lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from the evil one.

(This week's prayer can be found in Matthew 6:9-13, NIV.)
Submit your prayer to The Upper Room.

Something More

Buy 2 copies of The Upper Room Disciplines 2022 and bring a friend along as you walk in spiritual wisdom in 2022. Learn more.

Lectionary Readings

(Courtesy of Vanderbilt Divinity Library)

Looking for lectionary-based resources? Learn more about The Upper Room Disciplines.

2 Comments | Join the Conversation.

 

Today's Reflection

Forgiveness is made possible by the knowledge that human beings cannot offer us what only God can give. Once we have heard the voice calling us the Beloved, accepted the gift of full communion, and claimed the first unconditional love, we can see easily—with the eyes of a repentant heart—how we have demanded of people a love that only God can give. It is the knowledge of that first love that allows us to forgive those who have only a “second” love to offer.

—Henri J. M. Nouwen, in Forgiveness: Perspectives on Making Peace with Your Past, compiled and introduced by Amy Lyles Wilson (Fresh Air Books, 2008)

Today's Question

What spiritual practice helps you claim God’s unconditional love and accept the limitations of human love? Join the conversation.

Today's Scripture

For I am convinced that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor rulers, nor things present, nor things to come, nor powers, nor height, nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.
—Romans 8:38-39 (NRSV)

Prayer for the Week

Our Father in heaven,
hallowed be your name,
your kingdom come,
your will be done,
on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us today our daily bread.
And forgive us our debts,
as we also have forgiven our debtors.
And lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from the evil one.

(This week's prayer can be found in Matthew 6:9-13, NIV.)
Submit your prayer to The Upper Room.

Something More

Buy 2 copies of The Upper Room Disciplines 2022 and bring a friend along as you walk in spiritual wisdom in 2022. Learn more.

Lectionary Readings

(Courtesy of Vanderbilt Divinity Library)

Looking for lectionary-based resources? Learn more about The Upper Room Disciplines.

4 Comments | Join the Conversation.

 

Today's Reflection

One of the best ways of making forgiveness a reality is to pray for the welfare of the person who has caused you to suffer. That isn’t easy, but it is one of the gifts God gives us in the healing that forgiveness makes possible. Forgiveness is a gift, God’s gift, first of all, to each of us. And then a gift we give to others, a gift that, in the giving, brings to the giver unexpected and undeniable blessing.

—Kenneth Gibble, in Forgiveness: Perspectives on Making Peace with Your Past, compiled and introduced by Amy Lyles Wilson (Fresh Air Books, 2008)

Today's Question

How has prayer enabled you to receive or offer forgiveness? Join the conversation.

Today's Scripture

But I say to you that listen, Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, bless those who curse you, pray for those who abuse you.
—Luke 6:27-28 (NRSV)

Prayer for the Week

Our Father in heaven,
hallowed be your name,
your kingdom come,
your will be done,
on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us today our daily bread.
And forgive us our debts,
as we also have forgiven our debtors.
And lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from the evil one.

(This week's prayer can be found in Matthew 6:9-13, NIV).
Submit your prayer to The Upper Room.

Something More

Buy 2 copies of The Upper Room Disciplines 2022 and bring a friend along as you walk in spiritual wisdom in 2022. Learn more.

Lectionary Readings

(Courtesy of Vanderbilt Divinity Library)

Looking for lectionary-based resources? Learn more about The Upper Room Disciplines.

3 Comments | Join the Conversation.