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New every morning is your love, great God of light, and all day long you are working for good in the world. Stir up in us desire to serve you, to live peacefully with our neighbors and all your creation, and to devote each day to your Son, our Savior Jesus Christ. Amen.

"A Liturgy for Morning Prayer," Upper Room Worshipbook

Used by permission from the Book of Common Worship, © 2018 Westminster John Knox Press. All rights reserved. This prayer appears in “A Liturgy for Morning Prayer” in Upper Room Worshipbook.

 

Today's Reflection

When Jesus met a woman at the well on a dusty day, he told her that he could give her living water. … The kind of drinking that Jesus invites us to is not the polite, sipping from our teacups with pinkies extended kind of drinking. It’s a drinking that drenches us, that causes rivers of living water to flow out of our hearts. The cost of this drinking—the cost of giving ourselves to the flow—is that we can’t control where it goes.

—Jan L. Richardson, In the Sanctuary of Women: A Companion for Reflection and Prayer (Upper Room Books, 2010)

Today's Question

How have the “rivers of living water” led to places or people you didn’t expect? Join the conversation.

Today's Scripture

Jesus responded, “If you recognized God’s gift and who is saying to you, ‘Give me some water to drink,’ you would be asking him and he would give you living water.”
—John 4:10 (CEB)

Prayer for the Week

Lord, guide me to reflect on—and learn from—the decisions I made yesterday so that they might reshape the longings I have for tomorrow.
Submit your prayer to The Upper Room.

Something More

The featured book this week, In the Sanctuary of Women, highlights six women from around the world and across the centuries, inviting us to discover what their lives tell us about God. Come spend some time in the sanctuary of women, an often-ignored space in Jewish and Christian history. Read more.

Lectionary Readings

(Courtesy of Vanderbilt Divinity Library)

Looking for lectionary-based resources? Learn more about The Upper Room Disciplines.

Save 45% on the regular and enlarged-print editions of Disciplines 2021 with the promo code DISC45. Offer good while supplies last.

1 Comments | Join the Conversation.

 

Today's Reflection

Many of the ammas of the desert greatly valued stability, a spiritual practice that simply means to stay put. Stability is still one of the vows taken by those who become monastics. The vow recognizes that in committing ourselves to a particular place and staying rooted despite changes around and within us, we grow in a way that is different than if we are constantly on the move. … Stability is not just about physically remaining in one place. The practice of stability impels us to find something worth giving ourselves to for a long, long time—a place, a community, a person, a path—and in that, to grow deeper in relationship with the God who dwells there.

—Jan L. Richardson, In the Sanctuary of Women: A Companion for Reflection and Prayer (Upper Room Books, 2010)

Today's Question

How might you encounter God through the practice of stability in this season? Join the conversation.

Today's Scripture

But me? It’s good for me to be near God. I have taken my refuge in you, my Lord God, so I can talk all about your works!

—Psalm 73:28 (CEB)

Prayer for the Week

Lord, guide me to reflect on—and learn from—the decisions I made yesterday so that they might reshape the longings I have for tomorrow.
Submit your prayer to The Upper Room.

Something More

The featured book this week, In the Sanctuary of Women, highlights six women from around the world and across the centuries, inviting us to discover what their lives tell us about God. Come spend some time in the sanctuary of women, an often-ignored space in Jewish and Christian history. Read more.

Lectionary Readings

(Courtesy of Vanderbilt Divinity Library)

Looking for lectionary-based resources? Learn more about The Upper Room Disciplines.

Save 45% and receive free shipping on the regular and enlarged-print editions of Disciplines 2021 with the promo code DISC45. Offer good while supplies last.

1 Comments | Join the Conversation.

 

Today's Reflection

I know the places in my soul where the past makes its presence known, the occasions when memories surface, inviting my attention, encouraging me to see within them what I had not seen before. They come bearing comfort, or they come to offer questions.

In these thin places I sometimes have a keen sense of the shadows of other lives—fleeting impressions of what might have happened if I had made a different choice or if another path had opened to me at a crucial juncture or a seemingly ordinary one. I am not meant to inhabit or linger too long amid these glimpses of other lives, yet they visit nonetheless. They come as reminders of how it matters what we choose. They come too as a reminder of grace: that God can work within every choice, even the ones we made long ago.

—Jan L. Richardson, In the Sanctuary of Women: A Companion for Reflection and Prayer (Upper Room Books, 2010)

Today's Question

As you reflect on your choices, what encouragement do you find in God’s grace at every turn? Join the conversation.

Today's Scripture

Many plans are in a person’s mind, but the Lord’s purpose will succeed.

—Proverbs 19:21 (CEB)

Prayer for the Week

Lord, guide me to reflect on—and learn from—the decisions I made yesterday so that they might reshape the longings I have for tomorrow.
Submit your prayer to The Upper Room.

Something More

The featured book this week, In the Sanctuary of Women, highlights six women from around the world and across the centuries, inviting us to discover what their lives tell us about God. Come spend some time in the sanctuary of women, an often-ignored space in Jewish and Christian history. Read more.

Lectionary Readings

(Courtesy of Vanderbilt Divinity Library)

Looking for lectionary-based resources? Learn more about The Upper Room Disciplines.

Save 45% and receive free shipping on the regular and enlarged-print editions of Disciplines 2021 with the promo code DISC45. Offer good while supplies last.

 

4 Comments | Join the Conversation.

 

Today's Reflection

In Celtic spiritual traditions, the fluidity of time extends far beyond the stories of the saints. We encounter it, for instance, in the notion of thin places: spaces where the veil between worlds becomes transparent, and heaven and earth meet. … Thin places remind us that we travel in the presence of the communion of saints and in the company of the God who, in the person of Jesus, intersected and inhabited time. In taking flesh, God opened wide to time, to the effects of its passing, to the weight of chronology. Yet this God dwells also beyond time. It is a mystery, this simultaneous entering and shedding that God does with time. In the thin places, we are given a glimpse.

—Jan L. Richardson, In the Sanctuary of Women: A Companion for Reflection and Prayer (Upper Room Books, 2010)

Today's Question

How does God’s relationship to time shape your perspective? Join the conversation.

Today's Scripture

But do not ignore this one fact, beloved, that with the Lord one day is like a thousand years, and a thousand years are like one day.
—2 Peter 3:8 (NRSV)

Prayer for the Week

Lord, guide me to reflect on—and learn from—the decisions I made yesterday so that they might reshape the longings I have for tomorrow.
Submit your prayer to The Upper Room.

Something More

The featured book this week, In the Sanctuary of Women, highlights six women from around the world and across the centuries, inviting us to discover what their lives tell us about God. Come spend some time in the sanctuary of women, an often-ignored space in Jewish and Christian history. Read more.

Lectionary Readings

(Courtesy of Vanderbilt Divinity Library)

Looking for lectionary-based resources? Learn more about The Upper Room Disciplines.

Save 45% and receive free shipping on the regular and enlarged-print editions of Disciplines 2021 with the promo code DISC45. Offer good while supplies last.

4 Comments | Join the Conversation.

 

Today's Reflection

The stories of the saints are replete with displays of influence over the elements, animals, and other people; they could also alter the course of illness, injury, and even death. Most important, the miraculous signs and wonders that weave through the saints’ lives confirmed that they shared in the power of Christ. The hagiographers intended to convey that such power did not originate with the saints themselves but instead flowed from their kinship with Christ and their intense desire to model their lives on his own.

—Jan L. Richardson, In the Sanctuary of Women: A Companion for Reflection and Prayer (Upper Room Books, 2010)

Today's Question

What wonders have you observed of people who model their lives after Christ? Join the conversation.

Today's Scripture

Therefore be imitators of God, as beloved children, and live in love, as Christ loved us and gave himself up for us, a fragrant offering and sacrifice to God.
—Ephesians 5:1-2 (NRSV)

Prayer for the Week

Lord, guide me to reflect on—and learn from—the decisions I made yesterday so that they might reshape the longings I have for tomorrow.
Submit your prayer to The Upper Room.

Something More

The featured book this week, In the Sanctuary of Women, highlights six women from around the world and across the centuries, inviting us to discover what their lives tell us about God. Come spend some time in the sanctuary of women, an often-ignored space in Jewish and Christian history. Read more.

Lectionary Readings

(Courtesy of Vanderbilt Divinity Library)

Looking for lectionary-based resources? Learn more about The Upper Room Disciplines.

Save 45% and receive free shipping on the regular and enlarged-print editions of Disciplines 2021 with the promo code DISC45. Offer good while supplies last.

4 Comments | Join the Conversation.

 

Today's Reflection

Eve challenges us to look at where we have come from and to look again. She beckons us to consider how we tell our stories, how we participate in the making of them and the telling of them. Her story prompts us to reconsider our own stories, to question what we think we know about their contours and their meanings.

This is a story of original hunger. It invites us to trace the lines of our longings and where they have led us. It calls us to reckon with the ways we have hidden ourselves from the Holy and from one another. And in beckoning us to look back, it offers us the sustenance that will help us create the path ahead.

—Jan L. Richardson, In the Sanctuary of Women: A Companion for Reflection and Prayer (Upper Room Books, 2010)

Today's Question

When you trace the lines of your longings, where do they lead? Join the conversation.

Today's Scripture

Take delight in the LORD, and he will give you the desires of your heart.

—Psalm 37:4 (NRSV)

Prayer for the Week

Lord, guide me to reflect on—and learn from—the decisions I made yesterday so that they might reshape the longings I have for tomorrow.
Submit your prayer to The Upper Room.

Something More

The featured book this week, In the Sanctuary of Women, highlights six women from around the world and across the centuries, inviting us to discover what their lives tell us about God. Come spend some time in the sanctuary of women, an often-ignored space in Jewish and Christian history. Read more.

Lectionary Readings

(Courtesy of Vanderbilt Divinity Library)

Looking for lectionary-based resources? Learn more about The Upper Room Disciplines.

Save 45% and receive free shipping on the regular and enlarged-print editions of Disciplines 2021 with the promo code DISC45. Offer good while supplies last.

4 Comments | Join the Conversation.